Friends of Maple Grove presents David Holzman in Concert

When:
August 1, 2020 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
2020-08-01T16:00:00-04:00
2020-08-01T17:00:00-04:00
Where:
Friends of Maple Grove
84-15 127th St
Jamaica, NY 11415
USA
Cost:
Free
Contact:
The Center at Maple Grove Cemetery
3478786613
Friends of Maple Grove presents David Holzman in Concert @ Friends of Maple Grove | New York | United States

Join us this Saturday August 1st, 2020 4:00 pm for a special online concert by renowned pianist and music educator David Holzman. Friends of Maple Grove Cemetery is presenting a short talk by David and excerpts from his February “A Celebration” concert at the DiMenna Center.

To learn more about this remarkable musician: http://battlemuse.com/biography.htm
Event link: https://www.facebook.com/events/1678632245617507/

This concert is dedicated to the Delano Family.
Ransom Delano (1827-1891) & Charity Demarest Delano (1826-1898) at Maple Grove.
Ransom R Delano was born into a large family in Cortland County New York. The Delano family can be traced back to the 2nd ship to arrive at Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts in the 1600’s and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt is also descended from this family through his mother. Ransom Delano met Charity Demarest in 1844 when he came to the New York Institute for the Blind in Manhattan at age 20. Charity had also come from upstate New York to the institute two years earlier. They had both lost their sight due to illness. In 1854 they married and continued to live on the West Side of Manhattan not far from the Institute which was at 9th Ave. & 34th St. It is now known as the NY Institute for the Education of the Blind and is located in the Bronx. Ransom is listed in the Manhattan directories as working at several different trades from the 1860’s to the 1880’s and is listed as an upholsterer, mattress maker and brush maker. There is an article called Double Eagles for the Blind in the New York Herald in 1887, where the couple were among 500 blind people who came to the office of the Commissioners of Charities and Correction to be given an annual gift of $40 in the form of two twenty dollar gold pieces. The Superintendent knew almost every face and “pleasantly greeted them in turn.” Most of the men were employed as mattress makers, brush makers, piano tuners and musicians.

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