Feb
7
Thu
Filming Survivance: A Conversation With Diane Fraher @ Kupferberg Holocaust Center @ Queensborough Community College
Feb 7 @ 5:00 pm
Filming Survivance: A Conversation With Diane Fraher @ Kupferberg Holocaust Center @ Queensborough Community College | New York | United States

Speaker: Diane Fraher (Osage/Cherokee), filmmaker and founder and director of American Indian Artists Inc. (AMERINDA)

This program will include a screening of clips from two films by acclaimed Osage/Cherokee filmmaker Diane Fraher, The Reawakening (2014) and The Heart Stays. Fraher will discuss her own work, depictions of Native American people in film and the work of indigenous people within the American film industry. The Reawakening, which follows a successful attorney as he returns to his reservation to help his people, was the first film written and directed by a Native woman and wholly produced by Native people. Her current film, The Heart Stays is the first feature film with a Native woman in the lead role.

Mar
13
Wed
Standing With Standing Rock: Allyship And The Environment @ Kupferberg Holocaust Center @ Queensborough Community College
Mar 13 @ 12:00 pm
Standing With Standing Rock: Allyship And The Environment @ Kupferberg Holocaust Center @ Queensborough Community College | New York | United States

Speakers: Rabbi Mordechai Liebling, director of the Social Justice Organizing Program at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College & Rachel Waters, graduate student at the New School’s Milano School of International Affairs

The Dakota Access Pipeline protests, also known as #NODAPL or the Standing Rock protests, began after Energy Transfer Partners gained approval to build a pipeline that passes beneath near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Its construction results in devastating environmental impact and threatens the region’s waters as well as ancient burial grounds and sacred sites. In reaction, the Standing Rock Sioux tribe began a series of grassroots movements against the pipeline’s constructions, and were joined by protestors from across the country. The presenters will address the ongoing resistance movements lead by indigenous people and allies of different cultures and faiths not only at Standing Rock but also around other sites of possible oil pipelines and where resource extracting threatens land, water, sacred sites and lives.

Apr
11
Thu
Performing Survivance: Native American Theatre In New York City @ Kupferberg Holocaust Center @ Queensborough Community College
Apr 11 @ 5:00 pm
Performing Survivance: Native American Theatre In New York City @ Kupferberg Holocaust Center @ Queensborough Community College | New York | United States

Speakers/Performers: Muriel Miguel and Gloria Miguel, Founders of Spiderwoman Theatre

Founded in 1976 in New York City, Spiderwoman Theatre is the oldest indigenous people’s theatre company in the United States. Muriel Miguel and Gloria Miguel as well as their sister Lisa Mayo, are from the Kuna and Rappahannock nations and have formed the core of Spiderwoman Theatre since the beginning. Spiderwoman questions gender roles, cultural stereotypes, and sexual and economic oppression and address issues of sexism, racism, classism, and the violence in women’s lives within their innovative work. Their work bridges the traditional cultural art forms of storytelling, dance, and music and the practice of contemporary Western theater. Born in Brooklyn, their work springs from their own lives and experiences as “city Indians”. Muriel Miguel and Gloria Miguel will speak about their work and present a short two-person performance titled, “I am still here.”